Category Archives: Uncategorized

2/18-2/21

Lesson: 2.1 Printing in Java

Now that you’re comfortable using basic Java commands, it’s time to move into the Java console environment.

  • This program extends ConsoleProgram instead of Karel. This tells the program that it’s going to use the console instead of a Karel grid world.
  • The text is printed to the console with the System.out.println() command.

Lesson: 2.2 Variables and Types

Variables allow us to store information such as numbers, words, or true/false expressions. A variable can be thought of as a box that stores information inside. In Java, variables are composed of three things: a name, type, and value.

Lesson: 2.3 User Input

Being able to obtain user input creates new opportunities while coding. This allows us to take in data from the user to make our programs work for them.

Lesson: 2.4 Arithmetic Expressions

Arithmetic Expressions allow us to perform mathematical operations within Java.

Such expressions can be used for basic math and even more complex algorithms.

2/10-2/14


In this unit, students will bring together everything they have learned in the course to create a fully functional game. This takes several days to complete

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Synthesize the skills and concepts from Java Script Control Structures, Functions and Parameters, and Animation and Games to create their very own Breakout game from scratch!
  • Break down a large problem into smaller parts using Top Down Design, and solve each of these smaller parts using functions
  • Create helpful comments with preconditions and postconditions to help the reader understand the code
  • Find and fix bugs in large programs

2/3-2/7


In this unit, students will bring together everything they have learned in the course to create a fully functional game. This takes several days to complete

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Synthesize the skills and concepts from Java Script Control Structures, Functions and Parameters, and Animation and Games to create their very own Breakout game from scratch!
  • Break down a large problem into smaller parts using Top Down Design, and solve each of these smaller parts using functions
  • Create helpful comments with preconditions and postconditions to help the reader understand the code
  • Find and fix bugs in large programs

1/27-1/31


In this lesson, students learn how to extend mouse events to make interactive animations using the dragging motion of the mouse.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving

In this lesson we continue to use user input via the mouse to create interactive programs.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving.

In this lesson, students will learn how to use keyboard keys to control events. Keyboard events capture when the user presses keys on the keyboard. This allows students to write programs that take input from the keyboard to change what is happening in the program.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the keyboard input.

In this lesson, students will create programs that combine multiple ideas from this unit.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Synthesize the skills and concepts learned in the Animation and Games unit to create advanced, interactive programs.

In this lesson, students review content with a 25 question End-of-Unit Quiz.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Prove their knowledge of various concepts in animation through a multiple choice quiz

1/21-1/24


In this lesson, students learn how to extend mouse events to make interactive animations using the dragging motion of the mouse.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving

In this lesson we continue to use user input via the mouse to create interactive programs.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving.

In this lesson, students will learn how to use keyboard keys to control events. Keyboard events capture when the user presses keys on the keyboard. This allows students to write programs that take input from the keyboard to change what is happening in the program.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the keyboard input.

In this lesson, students will create programs that combine multiple ideas from this unit.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Synthesize the skills and concepts learned in the Animation and Games unit to create advanced, interactive programs.

1/13-1/17


In this lesson, students will be introduced to the concept of using timers for animation. Now instead of having graphics programs that stay the same, the content changes every time the timer runs. The first program students will see is a moving ball, so discussing this with the class as a demo on the projector is very useful.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain in their own words how animation works
  • Create animation in programs using the setTimer function
  • Explain what a callback function is

In this lesson, we’ll look at more examples with timers and start making more interesting animations. Students will use timers and the Randomizer to create animations on the canvas.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create programs with timers to create increasingly challenging animations
  • Analyze existing programs and explain how they create animations
  • Utilize the Randomizer to generate random events in their animations

In this lesson, students use timers in combination with the other ideas they have learned, including more graphics as well as coordinate math to create different objects. The random ghosts serves as a fun example to show how you can modify things once you have the basic building blocks in place to make them more readable and easier to alter.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain the general workflow of creating an animation program
  • Analyze animation programs and identify similarities and differences
  • Create increasingly challenging animations using timers, graphics, and the Randomizer

In this lesson, students build on the use of timers and utilize if statements inside timers to dynamically change what the animations are doing.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create increasingly challenging animations that simulate movement using timers

1/7-1/10


In this lesson, students will be introduced to the concept of using timers for animation. Now instead of having graphics programs that stay the same, the content changes every time the timer runs. The first program students will see is a moving ball, so discussing this with the class as a demo on the projector is very useful.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain in their own words how animation works
  • Create animation in programs using the setTimer function
  • Explain what a callback function is

In this lesson, we’ll look at more examples with timers and start making more interesting animations. Students will use timers and the Randomizer to create animations on the canvas.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create programs with timers to create increasingly challenging animations
  • Analyze existing programs and explain how they create animations
  • Utilize the Randomizer to generate random events in their animations

In this lesson, students use timers in combination with the other ideas they have learned, including more graphics as well as coordinate math to create different objects. The random ghosts serves as a fun example to show how you can modify things once you have the basic building blocks in place to make them more readable and easier to alter.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain the general workflow of creating an animation program
  • Analyze animation programs and identify similarities and differences
  • Create increasingly challenging animations using timers, graphics, and the Randomizer

In this lesson, students build on the use of timers and utilize if statements inside timers to dynamically change what the animations are doing.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create increasingly challenging animations that simulate movement using timers

11/18-11/22


It’s time to show what you’ve learned throughout this unit. Students have learned how to use control structures and have practiced writing programs to solve problems. In this unit, students will synthesize all of the skills and concepts learned in the Control Structures unit to solve increasingly challenging puzzles.

Objective

Students will be able to…
* Define a problem in their own words and plan out a solution to the problem
* Break a large problem down into smaller pieces and solve each of the pieces, then use these solutions as building blocks to solve the larger problem
* Utilize the proper control structures to create general solutions
* Write clear and readable code using control structures, decomposition, and comments

These lessons take several days to complete.

11/11-11/15


It’s time to show what you’ve learned throughout this unit. Students have learned how to use control structures and have practiced writing programs to solve problems. In this unit, students will synthesize all of the skills and concepts learned in the Control Structures unit to solve increasingly challenging puzzles.

Objective

Students will be able to…
* Define a problem in their own words and plan out a solution to the problem
* Break a large problem down into smaller pieces and solve each of the pieces, then use these solutions as building blocks to solve the larger problem
* Utilize the proper control structures to create general solutions
* Write clear and readable code using control structures, decomposition, and comments

This assignment takes several days to complete.

11/4-11/8


It’s time to show what you’ve learned throughout this unit. Students have learned how to use control structures and have practiced writing programs to solve problems. In this unit, students will synthesize all of the skills and concepts learned in the Control Structures unit to solve increasingly challenging puzzles.

Objective

Students will be able to…
* Define a problem in their own words and plan out a solution to the problem
* Break a large problem down into smaller pieces and solve each of the pieces, then use these solutions as building blocks to solve the larger problem
* Utilize the proper control structures to create general solutions
* Write clear and readable code using control structures, decomposition, and comments

This assignment takes several days to complete.