Lesson Plans 9/3-9/6


In this lesson, students learn about Top Down Design and Decomposition. Top Down Design is the process of breaking down a big problem into smaller parts.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Break a large problem down into smaller, simpler problems
  • Write methods that solve the simpler problems, and use them as building blocks to solve the larger problem
  • Compare programs and identify good vs poor decomposition

In this lesson, students learn how to style their programs by including comments. Comments allow students to leave notes on their program that makes it easier for other to read. Comments are written in plain English.
Commenting Your Code Example:

/*
 *  multi-line  comments
 */

// single line comments

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain the preconditions and postconditions of a function
  • Create clear and readable comments in their code that help the reader understand the code
  • Explain the purpose of comments

In this lesson, students are introduced to Super Karel! Since commands like turnRight() and turnAround() are so commonly used, students shouldn’t have to define them in every single program. This is where SuperKarel comes in. SuperKarel is just like Karel, except SuperKarel already knows how to turnRight and turnAround, so students don’t have to define those functions anymore!

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Write programs that use SuperKarel instead of Karel
  • Utilize the new toolbox of commands that SuperKarel provides over Karel
  • Read documentation to understand how to use a library (SuperKarel is an example of this)

In this lesson, students learn how to use for loops in their programs. The for loop allows students to repeat a specific part of code a fixed number of times.

For loops are written like this:

for(var i = 0; i < 4; i++)
{
    // Code to be repeated 4 times
}

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create for loops to repeat code a fixed number of times
  • Explain when a for loop should be a used
  • Utilize for loops to write programs that would be difficult / impossible without loops

In this lesson, students learn about the conditional statement “if”. Code within an “if statement” will only execute IF the condition is true.

if (frontIsClear()) {
    // Code to be executed only if front is clear
}

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Use conditions to gather information about Karel’s world (is the front clear, is Karel facing north, etc)
  • Create if statements that only execute code if a certain condition is true

Lesson Plans 8/26-8/30


In this lesson, students are introduced to CodeHS and how Karel the Dog can be given a set of instructions to perform a simple task.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Write their first Karel program by typing out all of the Karel commands with proper syntax
  • Explain how giving commands to a computer is like giving commands to a dog

In this lesson, students learn more about Karel and Karel’s world. Students learn about walls in Karel’s world, the directions Karel can face, and how to identify a location in Karel’s world using streets and avenues. In these exercises, students will begin to see the limitations of Karel’s commands. Students will need to apply Karel’s limited set of commands to new situations. For example, how can they make Karel turn right, even though Karel does not know a turnRight command?

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Identify the direction that Karel is facing
  • Predict what direction Karel will be facing after executing a series of commands
  • Identify a location in Karel’s world using Street, Avenue terminology

In this lesson, students will learn how they can create their own commands for Karel by calling and defining functions. Functions allow programmers to create and reuse new commands that make code more readable and scalable.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Define a function, and successfully implement functions in their code.
  • Teach Karel a new command by creating a turnRight() function

In this lesson, students learn in more detail about functions, and how they can use functions to break down their programs into smaller pieces and make them easier to understand.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create functions to teach Karel new commands
  • Explain the difference between defining and calling a function
  • Utilize these functions to write higher level Karel programs that go beyond the basic toolbox of commands that Karel starts with

In this lesson, students will deepen their understanding of functions by learning about the start function. The start function helps to organize the readability of code by creating a designated place where code that is going to be run in a program can be stored:

function start(){
   turnRight();
}

function turnRight(){
   turnLeft();
   turnLeft();
   turnLeft();
}

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain the functionality of the start function
  • Use the start function appropriately in their programs
  • Improve the readability of their code

Notebooks are due Friday August 30th.

Lesson Plans 8/19-23


How are computers organized? What are the main components of a computer? In this lesson, we will explore how different organizational structures of computers interact with each other to make computers functional.

Objective

Students will be able to…
-understand the main parts of a computer
-differentiate the difference between hardware and software
– identify input and output devices
-learn different types of networks

Discussion Questions

Beginning of class:

  • You’ve probably heard the terms “software” and “hardware” before. What do think these terms mean? How do they relate to computers?

End of class:

  • What are the different “parts” of a computer? What does each part do?
  • What is the difference between a LAN and WAN? How do these two networks interact?

Standards

  • 3A-CS-02

What kinds of software do computers use and need? This lesson breaks down what software is, types of software and how they interact, and the specific functions of the different types of software.

Objective

Students will be able to understand and identify different types of software and their functions

Discussion Questions

Beginning of class:

  • You’ve probably heard the term operating system. What do you think this is? Do you know what operating system your computer is using?

End of class:

  • What are a few examples of user application software?
  • What is the difference between user application software and system software?
  • What does a computer operation system do?

Standards

  • 3A-CS-02

What is hardware? How does hardware work? This lesson breaks down the different physical components of computers, and how they contribute to the function of the computer as a whole

Objective

Students will be able to understand and identify the physical components of a computer & their roles in computer functionality.

Discussion Questions

Beginning of class:

  • You’ve probably heard the term operating system. What do you think this is? Do you know what operating system your computer is using?

End of class:

  • What are the two types of memory? Explain the difference between the two.
  • What is the difference between Random Access Memory and Read Only Memory?
  • What is the difference between hardware and software?

Standards

  • 3A-CS-02

 

 

Grading Policy

Technology and Business Department Grade Policies

Daily Grades, Quizzes, and Homework. We will have at least 10 grades from this category. They will account for 40% of the student’s overall GPA for each 9 week grading period.

Tests and Projects. We will have at least 2 grades from this category. They will account for 60% of the student’s overall GPA for each 9 week grading period.

Absences. We will follow the make-up work procedures outlined in the student handbook.

Grade Posting to Skyward Grades. will be posted within one week of the assigned completion date.

Retesting. There will be no retesting in our department. We will allow a student to complete an extra assignment or project which will allow them to bring their test grade up to a 70.

Cheating. Anyone caught cheating will get a 0, and a discipline referral will be filled out and submitted to the principal.

Thanks

Classroom Procedures/Late Work Policy

Every student will arrive to class on time (before the tardy bell) and be seated.

Seats will not be assigned unless I decide otherwise due to behavior

Upon entering the room every student will turn in their cell phone to the designated area.

Every student will be prepared for class with their laptop/chrome books.  Make sure they are charged and/or that you have your charger.  There are plenty of plugs in the room to charge them.

Computers are to be used for class work only, no gaming or streaming during class

No headphones

Students will not be allowed to leave the classroom except for emergency situations or called out by the office.  Any students leaving the room will have a hall pass and be signed in and out by me.

All work is done in the classroom, however, homework may be assigned if a student is falling behind or absent.

Notebooks will be kept in the classroom of all handout assignments.  A weekly to bi-weekly grade will be taken on these notebooks.

Late work received one to two days past the due date will receive a grade no higher than 70.  No late work will be accepted for credit 3 days or longer after the due date.